COLLOIDAL COPPER : General Maintenance of body and mind: by taking
under the tongue.5 to 1 teaspoon every day for six days out of seven,
colloidal copper will cleanse arteries and veins and increase the elasticity
of veins, arteries, and soft tissue.The suggested six days a week dosage.
Antioxidant and Blood Cleansing: this is what copper is all about. It will
cause the veins to become temporarily enlarged with rich and healthy
clean blood. Observed when colloidal copper is applied topically directly
tothe skin. The veins beneath  become gauged with rich oxygenated blood.
To prevent osteoporosis; Take orally as above as well as apply to skin.
This also applies to the treatment of arthritis where copper should be
alwaysadded in equal parts to gold. Copper for Skin Care to stimulate the
regrowth of Collagen: by massaging directly on to the skin. Copper taken
orally as above can speed up the synapse response in the brain and thus
encourage a faster thinking response and brain clarity.This can be further
promoted by dropping two drops into the nasal passages. Also can be
used to help ear and inner ear problems using topically as ear drops. Copper

Strawman 0.9999 pure copper in colloidal form.

Strawman farm copper  an all natural mineral supplement in the form of a copper colloid consisting of nanometer particles of 0.9999 pure copper suspended in pure deionized water.

Copper is an essential trace element for humans and animals. Although Hippocrates is said to have recommended copper compounds as early as 400 B.C., scientists are still uncovering new information regarding the functions of copper in the human body.

Copper is an essential trace mineral that facilitates the activity of several enzymes. The mineral provides a role in the development and maintenance of the cardiovascular system, including the heart, arteries, and other blood vessels, the skeletal system, and the structure and function of the nervous system, including the brain.

Copper is a critical functional component of a number of essential enzymes, known as cuproenzymes. The copper-dependent enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase, plays a critical role in cellular energy production. Another cuproenzyme, lysyl oxidase, is required for the cross-linking of collagen and elastin, which are essential for the formation of strong and flexible connective tissue. The action of lysyl oxidase helps maintain the integrity of connective tissue in the heart and blood vessels and plays a role in bone formation.

A number of reactions essential to normal function of the brain and nervous system are catalyzed by cuproenzymes.

Copper is involved in respiration and the synthesis of hemoglobin. It is essential in the production of collagen and the neurotransmitter noradrenalin. It is an important blood antioxidant and prevents the rancidity of polyunsaturated fats.

Copper is involved in numerous enzyme systems that break down or build up body tissues. It plays a role in the production of the skin pigment melanin by converting the amino acid tyrosine. The mineral is essential for the synthesis of phospholipids, which are a component of the myelin sheath that surrounds nerves.

Copper works with iron in the development and maintenance of red blood cells and their protein hemoglobin.

Copper is tasteless - tastes like water.

Copper Content

Strawman copper contains 10 parts-per-million (PPM) of copper nanoparticles. Strawman copper tastes like water. By comparison, colloidal copper produced by other techniques contains a substantial amount of copper ions in addition to the copper nanoparticles. Ionic copper has a particularly nasty taste which some find so objectionable they cannot ingest the product.

Copper Uses

  • Promotes healthy skin.
  • Supports healthy cartilage and tendon regeneration.
  • Plays a critical role in cellular energy production.
  • Helps maintain the integrity of connective tissue in the heart and blood vessels.
  • Plays a role in bone formation.
  • Plays a role in the metabolism of the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine.
  • Functions as an antioxidant.
  • Necessary for normal iron metabolism and red blood cell formation.
  • Copper is known to play an important role in the development and maintenance of immune system function.
  • Copper increases the body's ability to absorb iron.

Safety and Storage

Strawman copper is contains only pure water and pure copper and is non-toxic.

  • Does not require refrigeration after opening.
  • No adverse side effects have ever been reported.
Shelf Life

Colloids made from non-noble metals such as copper have a limited shelf life, typically 4 to 6 months, once the bottle is opened. Air, which includes oxygen, enters the bottle when it is opened. The oxygen will cause the metal nanoparticles to slowly oxidize converting them into their ionic state. For this reason, it is best to purchase a bottle size that you would expect to consume in 4 months or less.

You should not use this product if you are allergic to copper!

Copper should probably not be taken by individuals with hemochromatosis because copper increases the body's ability to absorb iron. Hemochromatosis, the most common form of iron overload disease, is an inherited disorder that causes the body to absorb and store too much iron. The extra iron builds up in organs and damages them. Without treatment, the disease can cause these organs to fail. More on the importance of copper here.

Allergic reactions to copper, while not unheard of, are uncommon. Someone having an allergic reaction to copper would not be able to handle a metallic copper object such as copper jewelry without causing an allergic reaction. Those who are uncertain if they are allergic to copper should apply a few drops to the back of the hand to see if an allergic reaction results.

Dosage

The dosage for Strawman copper is typically one tablespoon (15mL) daily to help maintain health. Up to three tablespoons per day may be taken to help fortify the immune system when needed. Actual dosage will vary based on individual needs.

Biophysical Properties of Copper

Copper is an essential micro-nutrient, needed at 1.3 milligrams per day, according to the International Copper Association. It is needed for red blood cell formation, protein metabolism, the production of RNA, enzyme activity, hair and skin color, and the health of the nerves. Colloidal Copper has been used as a remedy for gray hair, burns, arthritis, parasites and viral and bacterial infections.  Colloidal Copper has been found helpful against multi-cellular parasites such as malaria, fungus, ring-worm, Cryptosporidium,  Toxoplasma, chronic bladder infections where bacteria have formed a multi-cellular biofilm.

Jan 2008: “High-dose copper reverses heart enlargement: Maximum safe level in drinking water is 2 ppm” from Journal of Experimental Medicine

Copper

Copper (Cu) is a heavy metal whose unbound ions are toxic. Colloidal Copper is not ionic but consists of  clusters of atoms called nanoparticles and thus does not have the toxicity of ionic copper.  Almost all of the copper in the body is present as a component of copper proteins, thereby reducing the in vivo concentration of unbound copper ions almost to zero. Genetic mechanisms control the processes by which copper is incorporated into apoproteins and those by which toxic accumulations of copper are avoided.

Almost every daily diet contains 2 to 3 mg of copper, only about half of which is absorbed. Any copper absorbed in excess of metabolic requirements is excreted through the bile, probably via hepatic lysosomes. On average, an adult has about 150 mg of copper in the body, of which about 10 to 20 mg is in the liver. The remainder is distributed ubiquitously.

ACQUIRED COPPER DEFICIENCY

In genetically normal people, acquired, environmental, or dietary abnormalities rarely cause clinically significant copper deficiency. The only reported causes of such deficiency are kwashiorkor; persistent infantile diarrhea, usually associated with a diet limited to milk; severe malabsorption, as in sprue; total parenteral nutrition that is copper-free; and excess intake of a zinc salt as a dietary supplement. Treatment must be directed at the cause of the deficiency, usually with the addition of 2 to 5 mg of cupric ion daily.

COPPER

GENERAL PROPERTIES

Symbol: Cu
Atomic Number: 29
Atomic Weight: 63.546
Density: 8.96 gm/cc
Melting Point: 1083.4 oC
Boiling Point: 2567 oC
Thermal Conductivity: 4.01 W/cm/oK @ 298.2 oK
Electrical Resistivity: 1.678 microhm-cm @ 20 oC
Electronegativity: 1.9 Paulings
Specific Heat: 0.092 Cal/g/oK @ 25 oC
Heat of Vaporization: 72.8 K-cal/gm atom at 2567 oC
Heat of Fusion: 3.11 Cal/gm mole

MATERIAL OVERVIEW

Characteristics:

Distinctive reddish color; ductile; excellent conductor of electricity. Complexing agent, coordination numbers 2 and 4. Dissolves readily in nitric and hot concentrated H2SO4, in HCl and dilute H2SO4 slowly but only when exposed to the atmosphere. More resistant to atmospheric corrosion than iron, forming a green layer of hydrated basic carbonate. Readily attacked by alkalies. A necessary trace element in human diet; a factor in plant metabolism. Essentially nontoxic in elemental form. Powder is combustible.

Copper increases iron assimilation; iron and copper work together in the formation of hemoglobin and red blood cells. Anemia can be a copper deficiency symptom. Various enzyme reactions require copper. Copper influences protein metabolism and general healing, improves vitamin C oxidation and is integral in the formation of RNA. Low or high copper levels can be found in those with mental and emotional problems. Copper helps rid the body of parasites such as ring worm, taenia,  and is beneficial for graying and thinning hair. Copper excess is not common because only a small percentage is assimilated, but toxicity problems can present serious disease states.

Some symptoms of a copper deficiency:

Allergies, Anemia, Aneurysm, Arthritis, Dry Brittle Hair, Edema, Gulf War Syndrome, Hair Loss / Baldness, Heart Disease, Hernias, High Blood Cholesterol, Hypo and Hyper Thyroidism, Kawasaki Disease, Liver cirrhosis, Oppressed breathing, Osteoporosis, Parasites, Parkinson’s Disease, Reduced Glucose Tolerance, Ruptured Disc, Skin Eruptions or Sores, Varicose Veins, White or Gray Hair, and Wrinkled skin.

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations

This is a fact sheet about a chemical that may be found in some public or private drinking water supplies. It may cause health problems if found in amounts greater than the health standard set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Why is Copper being regulated?

In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act. This law requires EPA to determine safe levels of chemicals in drinking water which do or may cause health problems. These non-enforceable levels, based solely on possible health risks and exposure, are called Maximum Contaminant Level Goals.

The MCLG for copper has been set at 1.3 parts per million (ppm) because EPA believes this level of protection would not cause any of the potential health problems described below.

Since copper contamination generally occurs from corrosion of household copper pipes, it cannot be directly detected or removed by the water system. Instead, EPA is requiring water systems to control the corrosiveness of their water if the level of copper at home taps exceeds an Action Level.

The Action Level for copper has also been set at 1.3 ppm because EPA believes, given present technology and resources, this is the lowest level to which water systems can reasonably be required to control this contaminant should it occur in drinking water at their customers home taps.

These drinking water standards and the regulations for ensuring these standards are met, are called National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. All public water supplies must abide by these regulations.

What are the health effects?

Short- and long-term effects: Copper is an essential nutrient, required by the body in very small amounts. However, EPA has found copper to potentially cause the following health effects when people are continually exposed to it at levels above the Action Level. Short periods of exposure can cause gastrointestinal disturbance, including nausea and vomiting. Use of water that exceeds the Action Level over many years could cause liver or kidney damage. People with Wilsons disease may be more sensitive than others to the effect of copper contamination and should consult their health care provide

How much Copper is produced and released to the environment?

Copper may occur in drinking water either by contamination of the source water used by the water system, or by corrosion of copper plumbing. Corrosion of plumbing is by far the greatest cause for concern. Copper is rarely found in source water, but copper mining and smelting operations and municipal incineration may be sources of contamination.

From 1987 to 1993, according to the Toxics Release Inventory copper compound releases to land and water totaled nearly 450 million lbs., of which nearly all was to land. These releases were primarily from copper smelting industries. The largest releases occurred in Utah. The largest direct releases to water occurred in Tennessee.

What happens to Copper when it is released to the environment?

All water is corrosive toward copper to some degree, even water termed noncorrosive or water treated to make it less corrosive. Corrosivity toward copper is greatest in very acidic water. Many of the other factors that affect the corrosivity of water toward lead can also be expected to affect the corrosion of copper.

How will Copper be detected in and removed from my drinking water?

The regulation for copper became effective in 1992. Between 1993 and 1995, EPA required your water supplier to collect water samples from household taps twice a year and analyze them to find out if copper is present above 1.3 ppm in more than 10 percent of all homes tested. If it is present above this level, the system must continue to monitor this contaminant twice a year.

If contaminant levels are found to be consistently above the Action level, your water supplier must take steps to reduce the amount of copper so that it is consistently below that level. The following treatment methods have been approved by EPA for controlling copper: Corrosion control.

Drinking Water Standards:

MCLG: 1.3 ppm

Action level: 1.3 ppm

References and links:

  1. References on benefits ands toxicity of Copper and Zinc  http://www.health2us.com/zn_cu.htm
  2. International Copper Association
  3. “A Common Parasite Reveals Its Strongest Asset: Stealth; Toxoplasma”  http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/20/science/20toxo.html?_r=1&th&emc=th&oref=slogin


A Brief History of The Health Support Uses of Copper

Throughout history, healers have understood the value of copper in obtaining and maintaining optimum health. Whether topically applied or ingested, many forms of copper and copper compounds (such as copper carbonate, copper silicate, copper oxide, copper sulfate, copper chloride, etc.) were used throughout history for the treatment of disease. Copper has been used for medicinal purposes as far back as ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome as well as in the ancient Aztec civilization.

Ancient Uses of Copper

An ancient Egyptian medical text, known as the Smith Papyrus (circa 2400 B.C.), mentions using copper as a sterilization agent for drinking water and wounds. Another ancient text, known as the Ebers papyrus (circa 1500 B.C.) mentions the use of copper for headaches, "trembling of the limbs," burns, and itching. The island of Cyprus provided a readily available supply of copper to Greece and is known to have provided much of the copper needed for the empires of ancient Phoenicia and Rome as well. It has also been documented that Israel's Timna Valley provided copper for the Pharaohs.

Hippocrates (circa 400 B.C.), known as the father of modern medicine (and for whom the doctor's Hippocratic oath was named) mentions copper as a treatment for leg ulcers associated from varicose veins. The Greeks also sprinkled a powder of copper oxide and copper sulfate on open wounds and treated wounds with a mixture of honey and red copper oxide.

In the first century A.D., the book De Materia Medica by Dioscorides, describes using verdigris (which they made by exposing metallic copper to vinegar steam to form copper acetate) in combination with copper sulfate as a remedy for bloodshot eyes, inflamed eyes, "fat in the eyes", and cataracts.

Evidence from the time of Roman physician Aulus Cornelius Celsus (14 to 37 A.D.), tells us that copper and its derivatives were firmly established as important drugs. In his book, De Medicina, Celsus details numerous uses for copper, along with specific instructions for the preparation of the particular form of copper recommended for each disease or condition. Among his specific directions are a copper oxide mixture made with raisin wine, saffron and myrrh for the treatment of venereal disease and a copper mixture made with rose oil for chronic ulcers.

Pliny (23 to 79 A.D.) described a number of remedies involving copper. Black copper oxide with honey was used to kill intestinal worms and purge the stomach. In diluted form, nose drops were used to "clear the head"; eardrops relieved ear discomfort and infection, and taken by mouth it relieved mouth sores and ulcers. Diluted copper mixtures were also used for "eye roughness," "eye pain and mistiness."

The ancient Aztec civilization also used copper for medical purposes, including gargling with a copper mixture for sore throats. In ancient India and Persia, copper was used to treat lung diseases. Copper compounds such as malachite and copper oxide were used on boils and other skin conditions. Copper acetate and copper oxide were used for eye infections. Evidence also shows us that nomadic Mongolian tribes used copper sulfate, taken by mouth, to treat venereal ulcers.

19th Century Copper

The first recorded observation of copper's role in the immune system in modern times was published in 1867 when it was reported that, during the cholera epidemics in Paris of 1832, 1849 and 1852, copper workers were immune to cholera.

In 1885, the French physician, Luton, reported using copper acetate in his practice to treat arthritic patients. For external application he made a salve of hog's lard and 30% neutral copper acetate. For internal treatment, he used pills containing 10 mg. of copper acetate.

In 1895, in a published review of the pharmacological actions of copper compounds, copper arsenate was reported to treat acute and chronic diarrhea as well as dysentery and cholera. An organic complex of copper developed by Bayer was shown to have curative powers in the treatment of tuberculosis. Copper treatment for tuberculosis continued until the 1940s.

20th Century Copper

As early as 1912, patients in Germany were treated for facial epithelioma with a mixture of copper chloride and lecithin, suggesting that copper compounds might assist anti-cancer activity.

Recent work with mice in the U.S. has shown that treatment of solid tumors with non-toxic doses of various organic complexes of copper markedly decreased tumor growth and metastasis and thus increased survival rate. These copper complexes did not kill cancer cells but caused them to revert to normal cells. Based on work in the treatment of cancers using copper complexes, researchers have found that these same complexes may prevent or retard the development of cancers in mice under conditions where cancers are expected to be induced.

First observed in rats in 1936, numerous studies have drawn attention to the relationship between copper deficiency and heart disease, which effect has now been traced to both a deficiency in copper and an imbalance in the copper-to-zinc ratio in the body.

In 1939, the German physician, Werner Hangarter, noticed that Finnish copper miners were unaffected by arthritis as long as they worked in the mining industry. This observation led Finnish medical researchers plus the Germans, Hangarter and Lübke, to successfully use a mixture of copper chloride and sodium salicylate to treat patients suffering from rheumatic fever, rheumatoid arthritis, neck and back problems, and sciatica.

A Manual of Pharmacology and its Applications to Therapeutics and Toxicology, published by W. B. Saunders Company in 1957 recommends the use of 0.5 gram of copper sulfate, dissolved in a glass of water, in a single dose, or three doses of 0.25 gram fifteen minutes apart, to induce vomiting. Interestingly, Pliny (23 - 79 A.D.) also mentions using copper for just this purpose.

Copper aspirinate has been shown not only to be more effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis than aspirin alone, but it has been shown to prevent or even cure the ulceration of the stomach often associated with aspirin therapy. More than 140 copper complexes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (aspirin and ibuprofen, for example) have been shown to be more active than their parent compounds.

It has been demonstrated that copper complexes such as copper aspirinate and copper tryptophanate, markedly increase healing rate of ulcers and wounds. For example, copper complexes heal gastric ulcers five days sooner than other reagents. Further, it has been shown that, whereas non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen and enefenamic acid suppress wound healing, copper complexes of these drugs promote normal wound healing while at the same time retaining anti-inflammatory activity.

With reports of seizures in animals and humans who had significant and prolonged copper deficiencies in their diets, researches postulated that copper plays a role in the prevention of seizures. Research uncovered that organic compounds which are not themselves anti-convulsants, exhibit anticonvulsant activity when combined with copper. Further, it was found that copper complexes of all anti-epileptic drugs are more effective and less toxic than their parent drugs.

The 1973 work by Dr. L.M. Klevay at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Human Nutrition Research Center pointed to a relationship between copper and cholesterol. In subsequent work, published in 1975, Dr. Klevay theorized that a metabolic imbalance between zinc and copper -- with more emphasis on copper deficiency than zinc excess - is a major contributing factor in coronary heart disease.

Subsequent work by other investigators has shown that copper complexes also can have a valuable role in the minimization of damage to the aorta and heart muscle as oxygenated blood reperfuses into tissues following myocardial infarction. This action is based on the anti-inflammatory action of copper complexes.

It has been speculated that the reason that the heart attack rate in France is lower than in the rest of Europe is because of the significant consumption by the French of red wine, which has a higher copper content than white wine because it is prepared with the skin of the grape intact.

Copper's role in the immune system has recently been supported by observations that individuals suffering from Menke's disease (an inherited disease in which there is defective copper absorption and metabolism) generally die of immune system-related phenomena and other infections. Further, animals deficient in copper have been shown to have increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens such as salmonella and listeria. This kind of evidence has led researchers to suggest that copper compounds not only can cure various conditions, but can aid in the prevention of disease.

Copper in the 21st Century

Copper jewelry worn directly on skin has been used for a hundred years or more as a remedy for many ailments, including arthritis. Now, copper bracelets to ease joint and arthritis pain are ubiquitous in health food stores, and health magazines and catalogues.

With the understanding that copper deficiency can result in gray hair, skin wrinkles, crow's feet, varicose veins and saggy skin, copper has recently been touted as a "Fountain of Youth" for its ability to improve the elastic fiber in skin, increase skin flexibility, and act as an anti-wrinkle treatment. It has even been said to be able to return gray hair back to its natural color.

As modern researches continue to investigate the role of copper in the functioning of the human body, the efficacy of copper as a trace element critical to human health and wellness is slowly but surely being discovered . . . or, shall we say, rediscovered, since the incredible healing properties of copper have been understood and used throughout human history.